Prosecco obsession is rotting drinkers’ teeth

Britain’s favourite bubbly is now becoming one of the main causes of tooth decay

 

Last year Briton’s drank more than 40 million litres of prosecco as the market for this Italian sparkling wine grew by a staggering 34 per cent, but now dentists are warning that the risk from over-indulging in this sweet, fizzy and acidic tipple could lead to frequent drinkers putting themselves more at risk of suffering rotten teeth and lost teeth.

 

There is no doubt about it that prosecco, as a cheaper alternative to champagne, has taken the nation by storm and it has now become the drink of choice for a growing number of mainly younger women.

At Carisbrook Dental we have certainly noticed the disturbing effects of this bubbly boom over the past few years and we have also recognised that prosecco has become one of today’s most serious causes of tooth decay.

 

The problem is, that unlike wine that tends to be drunk with meals, prosecco is often drunk over a prolonged period and the constant sipping of this sweet, acidic drink can have a devastating effect on the health and condition of a person’s teeth.

 

A spokesman for the British Dental Association said: “prosecco offers a triple whammy of carbonation, sweetness and alcohol, which combined becomes one of the prime causes of tooth decay”.

 

Carbonated drinks such as prosecco, which gain their fizz from the release of carbon dioxide, will dissolve into carbonic acid. It may be refreshing but this acid is also one of the main causes of tooth decay. In addition and every bit as worrying is that every ‘flute’ of prosecco contains about one teaspoon of sugar! Yet another serious cause of tooth decay.

 

The other effect of regularly drinking several glasses of prosecco is that the acid content also weakens tooth enamel. If the drinker then brushes their teeth too soon after drinking it, then serious damage to the teeth can be caused.

 

We don’t want to be called spoilsports, but our advice is not to have too much of any sweet, fizzy drink at any one time and although it certainly isn’t ‘cool’ – drinking through a straw can also help to protect teeth.

 

Our other advice is that if you have drunk more than a couple of glasses you should wait a few hours before you brush your teeth in order to give the enamel time to harden.

 

As one of the major causes of tooth decay this increasingly popular drink can lead to what dentists have termed a ‘prosecco smile’, when tooth decay has resulted in lost teeth. So please do not become a prosecco victim. We’re not saying don’t drink it. Just be aware of the risks. Moderation and common sense is the watchword.

 

If you do suspect that you are suffering from tooth decay please do not ignore it and visit your dentist before it progresses to a stage where the infected tooth has to be removed. To make an appointment to see one of our dental team please get in touch right away. You can call us on 0161 951 7295 or alternatively you can contact us by using the online form on our Appointments page.

 

 

Causes of Tooth Decay