More than half of under fours didn’t see a dentist last year

Parents are advised of a growing risk to children’s teeth

The Faculty of Dental Surgery (FDS) has revealed disappointing NHS data that almost sixty percent of children under four did not see a dentist in 2018. The guidelines are quite clear, state the FDS. Parents are advised to make sure young children are seen by a dentist as soon as their first teeth appear. Following that, health regulations advise that children’s teeth should be examined by the age of one and parents should arrange check ups at least every twelve months.

 

If this advice is not followed, the risk of damage to children’s teeth could have long-term consequences in later life.

 

It is a fact that children who suffer from early childhood tooth decay are far more likely to experience subsequent dental problems, including an increased risk of decay in their baby and adult teeth.

 

At Carisbrook we most certainly agree with these findings and our advice to parents about their children’s teeth is to allow the child to become accustomed to visiting their dentist from a very early age. The first examination may be nothing more than coaxing the child to open their mouth for the dentist. We stress that children must view visits to the dentist as a normal procedure and a non-stressful part of life.

 

If a child’s first visit to a dentist is when they already have a problem then it is quite likely that they will then always associate dentists with pain or fear. It could lead to dental phobia and as nervous patients this fear of dentists can blight the health of their teeth for life.

 

Equally as important as introducing children to their dentist at an early age is that parents should also install the importance of regular brushing for their children’s teeth. In fact our cleaning advice is that parents should always brush their children’s teeth as soon as they first appear and then as the child grows older they should still supervise teeth cleaning to ensure children brush their teeth effectively.

 

There is also strong evidence that parents today are allowing their children to binge on sweet foods and drinks. Sugar, say the experts, is fuelling the epidemic level of tooth decay in children’s teeth and in 2016/17 dentists had to remove rioting teeth in nearly 43,000 operations.

 

We cannot stress enough the importance of good diet, good teeth brushing habits, good oral hygiene and regular visits by young children for dental check ups. If you would like to arrange an appointment so that we can examine your young children’s teeth then please do not hesitate to contact us. You can call us on 0161 951 7295 or alternatively you can contact us by using the online form on our Appointments page.

Children’s Teeth